Why golfers BENEFIT so much from finding their heels

If you aren’t already, stand up, and notice where your weight is on your feet. I bet you that you are on your mid-foot and/or toes. Don’t worry, this is normal, but not ideal if you want to be a better golfer or stay out of pain.​

Now, try to lean forward completely on your toes. Ouch! That’s kicking in your quads and back. Then try to find 100% on your heels. That feels…weird. Off balance, but your quads and back is likely to relax.

What you’ve discovered is how weight distribution affects posture and muscle activation. As humans we tend to default to having our weight forward, which kicks in our back and quads (see the image below. Anterior tilt = weight on toes).

Anterior-Pelvic-Tilt.jpg

If we are stuck in this extended state, we are going to struggle to rotate. Our days out golfing are going to hurt instead of be enjoyable. Our ribs MUST be back in order for us to rotate (see THIS article for more info).

Our heels are a secret to unlocking our golf game. Heels will kick in hamstrings, glutes, and abs, which we all need in an effective swing. It will allow you to rotate freely while keeping you out of pain. This doesn’t mean you keep 100% of your weight in your heels as you swing so that you fall backwards. What I am describing is an even weight distribution, about 50% on your heels and 50% on your mid-foot.

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Next time you hit the range or play a round, try this out! You can benefit enormously from just a simple change like this. At Sandhills Sports Performance, we specialize in helping clients find their heels and turn on the right muscles. If you would like to learn more, click HERE to sign up for a FREE complementary consultation with us!

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Why you SHOULDN’T stretch your hamstrings

How many times have you spoken, thought, or heard the following sentence?

“Man, my hamstrings are so tight!”​

The next logical idea would be to stretch them out. You might bend over and reach for those toes, or maybe prop your leg up one at a time on a desk and feel that sweet relief.

The problem is, you just made you problem worse. That’s right, worse.

For too long the fitness industry has been a proponent of hamstring stretching to relieve tightness in your back and legs. However, what they didn’t consider is that the body naturally gravitates to a state of anterior pelvic tilt and lumbar extension. In layman’s terms, we live our lives with our backs arched and our ribs flared up. It’s comfortable, it’s familiar.

Anterior-Pelvic-Tilt.jpg

Take a look at the image above. If you have any back pain, hamstring tightness, or dysfunction in general, changes are you are stuck in this anteriorly tilted position. Look at the hamstrings – they attach on the back of your pelvis and knees.

So here’s the question: If we live in a state of constant anterior tilt and our hamstrings are lengthened, WHY are we stretching them?!

Imagine a rope that has two people on each end. If both people are pulling on each end, of course that rope is going to be very tight. Your hamstrings are that rope and they aren’t tight because they’re short and overactive, they’re tight because they over-lengthened and being pulled on all the time from both directions!

Here’s an even more interesting thought: The way to fix your hamstring tightness is to turn on your hamstrings. We need to restore them to a more optimal resting length so they can relax and your pelvis can get out of an overly-rotated state.

We are very fortunate to be able to implement Postural Restoration Institute methodology at our clinic, where we specialize in recognizing the patterns the human body falls into, just like this one. Every day we get to work with individuals who have this anterior tilt and we help them get out of it!

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Why all golfers must have reaching in their training

Why All Golfers Must REACH

Do you feel that your backswing or follow through isn’t what it used to be? Are you unable to dissociate your pelvis from your hips? Does your swing feel stuck even after hours of practice? Those are just a few examples of symptoms of a stiff ribcage. A lot of humans, golfers included, have stiff ribcages that limit proper breathing mechanics. If you cannot breathe into your posterior mediastinum (your back ribs), your diaphragm cannot function optimally. To compensate, you will likely kick in your neck to assist you in pulling in air, further stiffening the muscles around your ribcage.

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The secret is this: The posterior mediastinum can unlock your golf game. If you can breathe into it, you have the ability to rotate your thorax and thoracic spine freely. A good golf swing involves a posteriorly-rotated pelvis with the ribs back, which allows for optimal rotation. A free thorax will equal a smooth, controlled swing without mobility limitations. A stiff thorax will force you to compensate and use improper muscles such as your back to make up for a lack of mobility where it should be (in your thorax).

Reaching is absolutely one of the most necessary movements a golfer can have in their exercise program. Reaching activities bring down your ribcage to force air into your posterior mediastinum. A great example of this would be a Wall Supported Reach. Notice how her ribs are down and just her low back is on that wall, opening up her upper back to take in air.

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Correct breathing is the key to everything. Good respiration during activity will involve a inhalation through the nose and full exhalation through the mouth. Every day at Sandhills Sports Performance, I have every client do at least one reaching activity. It keeps them healthy, feeling good, and fires up all the right muscles.

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Working with Duffy Golf Fitness in Great Britain

Chris Poulin’s recent trip to St. Andrews, Scottland was more for work than pleasure, although he would probably claim both.

Chris has been consulting with Duffy Golf Fitness and helping them integrate the concepts of Postural Restoration in the training and reconditioning of their athletes.  Staying competitive in professional golf means to be sure that your body is working correctly for you.  Postural restoration is being utilized to do just that for these talented group of players.

Stephen Gallacher, Tommy Fleetwood, Danny Willet, Lee Slattery, Brett Rumford, Alejandro Canizares, Matt Baldwin, Paul Waring and Dave Horsey

Most Golfers Need This Exercise

Most of my golfers need this exercise regardless of their ability level.  The “Unresisted Wall Reach” is an exercise example to help golfers who struggle with maintaining their spine angle in their backswing.

Spine angle is the angle between the thighs and the back (generally about 110-130°).  It is a key factor in enabling you to turn efficiently, and to swing powerfully and consistently, while protecting your back and avoiding back pain and injury.

Remember, as with all postural behavior exercises, it is important that this exercise is performed under the direction of a trained clinician.